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Intermittent and continuous energy restriction result in similar weight loss, weight loss maintenance, and body composition changes in a 6 month randomized pilot study.

PubMed Feed (Donnelly J and KU) - Wed, 12/16/2020 - 11:51
Related Articles

Intermittent and continuous energy restriction result in similar weight loss, weight loss maintenance, and body composition changes in a 6 month randomized pilot study.

Clin Obes. 2020 Dec 10;:e12430

Authors: Steger FL, Donnelly JE, Hull HR, Li X, Hu J, Sullivan DK

Abstract
Poor adherence is a barrier to successful weight control. Intermittent energy restriction (IER) provides an alternative approach to those for whom daily energy restriction is not ideal. This study assessed changes in weight, body composition, and macronutrient intake for an IER and a continuous energy restriction (CONT) approach within a multicomponent weight management intervention. We randomized 35 adults with overweight/obesity (BMI = 31.2 ± 2.4 kg/m2 ) to CONT or IER for 24 weeks (12-week weight loss intervention and 12 weeks of weight loss maintenance). Diets were delivered within a multimodal weight management program including weekly group meetings with a registered dietitian, increased physical activity, and a comprehensive lifestyle change program. Retention and adherence were similar for CONT and IER. Weight, BMI, fat mass, percentage body fat, waist circumference, hip circumference, blood pressure, and heart rate all decreased after 24 weeks (all, P < .01), but there were no main effects of group (all, P > .27). Weight loss was clinically relevant in both CONT (11.38 ± 7.9%) and IER (9.37 ± 9.7%), and the proportion of each group achieving 5% weight loss was 82 and 61% (P = .16), respectively. Participant satisfaction was high in both groups. The results from this study (a) support the feasibility of IER as an alternative for weight loss and weight loss maintenance, (b) indicate that IER is an effective alternative to CONT for weight control and improvements in body composition, and (c) emphasize the importance of intensive lifestyle interventions with ongoing support for effective behaviour modification.

PMID: 33305526 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

The effects of exercise session timing on weight loss and components of energy balance: midwest exercise trial 2.

PubMed Feed (Donnelly J and KU) - Wed, 12/02/2020 - 08:43
Related Articles

The effects of exercise session timing on weight loss and components of energy balance: midwest exercise trial 2.

Int J Obes (Lond). 2020 01;44(1):114-124

Authors: Willis EA, Creasy SA, Honas JJ, Melanson EL, Donnelly JE

Abstract
BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Circadian physiology has been linked to body weight regulation and obesity. To date, few studies have assessed the association between exercise timing and weight related outcomes. The aim of this secondary analysis was to explore the impact of exercise timing (i.e., 24 h clock time of exercise session) on weight loss and components of energy balance.
SUBJECTS/METHODS: Overweight/obese (BMI 25.0-39.9 kg/m2), physically inactive, young adults (~51% female) completed a 10-month supervised exercise program (400 or 600 kcal/session for 5 days/week) or served as non-exercise controls (CON). Participants were categorized based on the time of day in which they completed exercise sessions (Early-Ex: >50% of sessions completed between 7:00 and 11:59 am; (n = 21), Late-Ex: >50% of sessions completed between 3:00 and 7:00 pm; (n = 25), Sporadic-Ex: <50% of sessions completed in any time category; (n = 24), and CON; (n = 18)). Body weight, energy intake (EI; digital photography), and non-exercise physical activity (NEPA; accelerometer) were assessed at baseline, 3.5, 7, and 10 months. Total daily energy expenditure (TDEE; doubly labeled water), was assessed at baseline and 10 months.
RESULTS: At month 10, weight loss was significantly greater in both Early-EX (-7.2 ± 1.2%; p < 0.001) and Sporadic-EX (- 5.5 ± 1.2%; p = 0.01) vs CON (+0.5 ± 1.0%), and Early-EX vs Late-EX (-2.1 ± 1.0%; p < 0.001). There were no between group differences for change in TDEE, EI, and non-exercise energy expenditure (P > 0.05). A significant group × time interaction (p = 0.02) was observed for NEPA (counts/min), however, after adjusting for multiple comparisons, group effects were no longer significant.
CONCLUSIONS: Despite minimal differences in components of energy balance, Early-EX lost significantly more weight compared with Late-Ex. Although the mechanisms are unclear, the timing of exercise may be important for body weight regulation.

PMID: 31289334 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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