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The feasibility of using pedometers for self-report of steps and accelerometers for measuring physical activity in adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities across an 18-month intervention.

Wed, 07/19/2017 - 10:16
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The feasibility of using pedometers for self-report of steps and accelerometers for measuring physical activity in adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities across an 18-month intervention.

J Intellect Disabil Res. 2017 Aug;61(8):792-801

Authors: Ptomey LT, Willis EA, Lee J, Washburn RA, Gibson CA, Honas JJ, Donnelly JE

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Improving physical activity in adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs) is recommended to improve weight loss and general health. However, in order to determine the success of physical activity interventions, identification of feasible methods for assessment of physical activities is necessary. The purpose of this study is to assess the feasibility of adults with IDD to track daily steps and wear an accelerometer.
METHODS: Overweight/obese adults with mild to moderate IDD followed a diet and physical activity program for 18 months. All participants were asked to wear a pedometer and track steps daily by using a pedometer and to provide accelerometer data for 7 days at baseline, 6, 12 and 18 months. Adherence to the pedometer protocol and plausibility of the number of recorded steps were assessed, and these measures along with average wear time of the accelerometer were recorded.
RESULTS: Data were collected from 149 participants (36.5 ± 12.2 years of age, 57% female). Participants recorded a step value on 81.5% of days across the 18-month study, with 40.9% of written days classified as plausible. When wearing the accelerometer, 26.8% of participants met the recommended 4-day/10-h wear time criterion at baseline, and 22.6, 24.8 and 18.8% met the criterion at 6, 12 and 18 months, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS: Adults with IDD will adhere reasonably well to wearing a pedometer long term, but may be unable to record the step data accurately. Furthermore, adults with IDD have poor compliance with accelerometer protocols, and future studies should determine if a shorter wear time protocol would produce valid data in this population.

PMID: 28707359 [PubMed - in process]

Energy Expenditure and Intensity of Classroom Physical Activity in Elementary School Children.

Wed, 07/19/2017 - 10:16
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Energy Expenditure and Intensity of Classroom Physical Activity in Elementary School Children.

J Phys Act Health. 2016 Jun;13(6 Suppl 1):S53-6

Authors: Honas JJ, Willis EA, Herrmann SD, Greene JL, Washburn RA, Donnelly JE

Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is limited data regarding objectively measured energy cost and intensity of classroom instruction. Therefore, the purpose of current study was to objectively measure energy cost and subsequently calculate MET values using a portable indirect calorimeter (IC) for both normal classroom instruction (NCI) and active classroom instruction (ACI).
METHODS: We assessed energy expenditure (EE) and intensity levels (METs) in elementary school children (17 boys and 15 girls) using an IC (COSMED K4b2). Independent t-tests were used to evaluate potential sex and grade level differences for age, BMI, VO2, EE, and METs.
RESULTS: The average EE for NCI and ACI were 1.8 ± 0.4 and 3.9 ± 1.0, respectively. The average intensity level for NCI and ACI were 1.9 ± 0.4 and 4.2 ± 0.9 METs, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS: PA delivered through ACI can elicit EE at a moderate intensity level. These results provide evidence for ACI as a convenient/feasible avenue for increasing PA in youth without decreasing instruction time.

PMID: 27392380 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Impact of 3 Years of Classroom Physical Activity Bouts on Time-on-Task Behavior.

Wed, 06/21/2017 - 08:15
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Impact of 3 Years of Classroom Physical Activity Bouts on Time-on-Task Behavior.

Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2017 Jun 13;:

Authors: Szabo-Reed AN, Willis EA, Lee J, Hillman CH, Washburn RA, Donnelly JE

Abstract
Participation in classroom physical activity (PA) may improve time-on-task (TOT), however, the influence of sustained moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) on TOT is unknown.
PURPOSE: To explore the influence of classroom PA delivered with academic lessons on TOT, determine if the relationship between classroom PA and TOT differs by age, sex, race/ethnicity, weight or baseline fitness, and identify the influence of MVPA on TOT when controlling for demographic variables.
METHODS: Teachers in intervention schools were asked to deliver two, 10-minute PA lessons/day, 5 days/week. PA was observed in both intervention and control schools to determine the amount and intensity of PA. TOT was observed prior to and immediately following PA. Anthropometrics and fitness were assessed at baseline and end of the school year for 3 years. Multilevel modeling was utilized to estimate overall group difference, change over the study, and group difference in change while accounting for covariates.
RESULTS: Students who participated in PA lessons engaged in significantly more MVPA than those in the control schools in all three years (all p<.001). There was a significant linear increase in the percent of TOT before PA lessons for both control and intervention groups over the 3-year period (p<.001), with no group difference. The intervention group spent significantly more TOT (p=.01) following PA than the control group. The percent of time spent in MVPA was significantly associated with the percent of TOT (p<.01).
CONCLUSION: Results indicate that children who received PA lessons participated in significantly more MVPA than those who did not and that PA was significantly associated with more TOT. These findings provide support for classroom PA as a means of increasing TOT in elementary aged children.

PMID: 28614194 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


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